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Reflecting History

Reflecting History is an educational history podcast that explores significant historical events and themes without losing track of the ordinary people involved. Covering a wide variety of topics, it is a narrative driven podcast that delves into the connection between history, psychology, and philosophy on a personal level.
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Now displaying: August, 2019
Aug 26, 2019

Historians, philosophers, and armchair historians have often pondered the role of chance in history. To what extent does randomness or luck dictate what happens to us? Are the events of history just a random spin on the wheel of fate, or is there a more determined explanation of historical events? Bringing up questions about historical free will, determinism, and cause-effect relationships, this episode goes through some of the history of people thinking about these types of questions. It also discusses some historical examples of "chance" in action, and the implications that asking these questions has for the study of history-particularly as it relates to the recent rise of "counterfactual" history. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Aug 5, 2019

When Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon to ignite yet another Roman Civil War, nobody at the time knew that this was the end of the Republic. Caesar's victory in his clash with the forces of Pompey, his former friend and member of the 1st triumvirate, led to Caesar's rule as dictator in which he tried to alleviate the problems of the Republic in a similar fashion as popular reformers of years past. But the Ides of March were coming, and Caesar's heir Octavian would emerge from a struggle with Marc Antony as undisputed emperor of the Roman World: Augustus Caesar. The Roman Republic was dead. 

This is the final episode in a series on the downfall of the Roman Republic. It focuses on the final years of the Roman Republic, and summarizes why it fell by a combination of factors that have been discussed in the series. Thanks for listening.

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

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