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Reflecting History

Reflecting History is an educational history podcast that explores significant historical events and themes without losing track of the ordinary people involved. Covering a wide variety of topics, it is a narrative driven podcast that delves into the connection between history, psychology, and philosophy on a personal level.
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Now displaying: February, 2019
Feb 19, 2019

After the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, a fierce political battle ensued for the soul of modern China. But it was the ordinary people of China who had spent the past 10 years fighting through chaos, violence, and oppression who helped forge a new path. Many never made it through the revolution, but many also took matters into their own hands by finding creative ways to survive and seize economic opportunities to put food on the table and protect their families. Millions took part in a "silent revolution" to preserve their traditions, cultures, and identities in the face of unimaginable tragedy. For the survivors who made it out on the other side of the Cultural Revolution, the world would never be the same. 

This is the final episode in a series on the Cultural Revolution. It focuses on the politics surrounding Mao Zedong as well as the actions of everyday people to survive and drive change in China. Thanks for listening to the series. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Feb 12, 2019

In the 1970's Red Guards and "undesirables" were forced to toil away in rural China working at re-education camps or doing manual labor in the people's communes. The ordinary people of China continued to suffer and found little motivation to carry on the Cultural Revolution. Mao and the communist party realized they needed to add extra incentive if the revolutionary goals were to be realized. It turns out nothing motivates like a strong dose of nationalism and the fear of nuclear war.

This is part VII in a multi-part series on the Cultural Revolution in China. It focuses on the mass movement of people into the countryside, and the mobilization of the entire country for a potential war. The next episode after this will be the last episode in the series, discussing the end of the Cultural Revolution.  

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Feb 5, 2019

The Cultural Revolution began as a campaign against bad class elements, but spiraled out of control as counter-revolutions emerged throughout the country between rebel groups and the local party establishments. As the chaos got out of control, the army had to step in and take control of the country. But whose side would they be on? Sadly for the average person in China at this period, it probably didn't matter as the violence and destruction would continue.

This is Part VI in a series on the Cultural Revolution. It focuses on what was probably the most chaotic and destructive period of the Cultural Revolution. Future episodes will discuss how the end of the Cultural Revolution is in sight, but a whole lot more tragedy would unfold before then. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

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