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Reflecting History

Reflecting History is an educational history podcast that explores significant historical events and themes without losing track of the ordinary people involved. Covering a wide variety of topics, it is a narrative driven podcast that delves into the connection between history, psychology, and philosophy on a personal level.
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Dec 10, 2019

The Bosnian War is known historically for it's vicious cruelty. Ancient hatreds and the impact they had on the people of Bosnia are often used as a primary explanation for the conflict. Kenan Trebincevic was a survivor of the war, wracked by hatred and anger. After escaping his homeland to America, he made a visit to Bosnia years later to face down his past and get vengeance for what he and his family were made to go through. On his journey home, he discovered perhaps a more powerful force than vengeance: forgiveness. Why is forgiveness important? Why is the process of forgiveness so difficult? Is it worthwhile?

This is part five in a series on the Bosnian War. Future episodes will cover different aspects of the conflict, including the the role of journalism in the war, the role of United States foreign policy and the United Nations in the conflict, ethnic cleansing, and the Bosnian Genocide. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Nov 19, 2019

As Bosnia was torn asunder by war and destruction, a newspaper known as Oslobodjenje endured the heat of the Siege of Sarajevo and gained worldwide recognition for it's reporting and it's ability to continue publishing papers in a war zone. Their building was destroyed, their supplies were minimal, and their people were killed, but somehow the paper endured. The reporters at Oslobodjenje provided a valuable service to the community by keeping the people informed of big picture events in the war, but also keeping up with the daily tragedy that was life in Sarajevo. In addition to struggling for their lives, editors and reporters struggled with journalistic questions of objectivity, bias, and emphasis. Should you report everything that comes across your desk during a war? What if it gives the other side an advantage? Should you make an extra effort to be fair in your reporting to people who are actively trying to kill you? What's more important: journalistic integrity or survival? The experience of Oslobodjenje and it's employees provides a great opportunity to think about the ethical questions that any free press faces.

This is part four in a series on the Bosnian War. Future episodes will cover different aspects of the conflict, including the role of United States foreign policy and the United Nations in the conflict, ethnic cleansing, and the Bosnian Genocide. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Nov 10, 2019

For this episode, I sat down with author and historian S.C. Gwynne to discuss the American Civil War and his latest book, "Hymns of the Republic." We talked about Lincoln's opinions on slavery, the causes of the Civil War, why many refuse to see slavery as the primary cause of the war, the African-American experience during the war, medical disasters during the war and the role of Clara Barton, the brutality of the war for the common soldier, the critical election of 1864, how we should think about the morality of the war, the legacy of the Civil War and modern day parallels, among other topics. 

S.C. Gwynne is a best selling author of numerous history books, including his biography of Stonewall Jackson "Rebel Yell" and his look at the Comanche Indians and the American West in "Empire of the Summer Moon." He was won numerous awards and been nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for his writing. 

If you are wondering about Part IV of the Bosnian War series, it's coming next week!

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Oct 28, 2019

Hatred is often given as the historical reason for wars and other nasty events throughout history. There was certainly plenty of it to go around in Bosnia during the 1990's, but how have historians been able to make sense of it? Why did neighbors, friends, and countrymen begin to turn on each other and do horrible things to each other? Is the best answer simply hatred? Or is there something deeper at play? It turns out psychological forces like cognitive dissonance may be able to explain some of these questions.

This is part three in a series on the Bosnian War. Future episodes will cover different aspects of the conflict, including the the role of journalism in the war, the role of United States foreign policy and the United Nations in the conflict, ethnic cleansing, and the Bosnian Genocide. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

 

Oct 7, 2019

For well over two years, Bosnian Serb forces bombarded Sarajevo in an attempt to destroy the city and break the spirit of the people who lived there. Thousands of civilians (including children) were killed in an attempt by Bosnian Serb forces to divide the city and stir ethnic hatred. People lived without food, running water, electricity, or heat. While survival became the priority for most ordinary people, their collective experience of surviving against the odds and standing up to a bully coalesced into something that will always be remembered. 

This is part two in a series on the Bosnian War. Future episodes will cover different aspects of the conflict, including the role of journalism in the war, the role of United States foreign policy and the United Nations in the conflict, ethnic cleansing, and the Bosnian Genocide. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Sep 16, 2019

No one who lived through it will ever forget what happened in Bosnia during the 1990's. What had been a unified and (mostly) peaceful region only a few years before melted down into war, chaos, and genocide. The causes of the war are hotly debated, probably due to the complexity of the conflict. Ultimately it was ethnic, political, and religious differences that merged with nationalism to give the 20th century one last European war to be haunted by.

This is part one in a series on the Bosnian War. It gives an overview of some of the themes of the conflict and goes over the origins of the war. Future episodes will cover different aspects of the conflict, including the Siege of Sarajevo, the role of journalism in the war, the role of United States foreign policy and the United Nations in the conflict, ethnic cleansing, and the Bosnian Genocide. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Aug 26, 2019

Historians, philosophers, and armchair historians have often pondered the role of chance in history. To what extent does randomness or luck dictate what happens to us? Are the events of history just a random spin on the wheel of fate, or is there a more determined explanation of historical events? Bringing up questions about historical free will, determinism, and cause-effect relationships, this episode goes through some of the history of people thinking about these types of questions. It also discusses some historical examples of "chance" in action, and the implications that asking these questions has for the study of history-particularly as it relates to the recent rise of "counterfactual" history. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Aug 5, 2019

When Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon to ignite yet another Roman Civil War, nobody at the time knew that this was the end of the Republic. Caesar's victory in his clash with the forces of Pompey, his former friend and member of the 1st triumvirate, led to Caesar's rule as dictator in which he tried to alleviate the problems of the Republic in a similar fashion as popular reformers of years past. But the Ides of March were coming, and Caesar's heir Octavian would emerge from a struggle with Marc Antony as undisputed emperor of the Roman World: Augustus Caesar. The Roman Republic was dead. 

This is the final episode in a series on the downfall of the Roman Republic. It focuses on the final years of the Roman Republic, and summarizes why it fell by a combination of factors that have been discussed in the series. Thanks for listening.

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Jul 15, 2019

With the Republic rebuilding after the wreckage caused by Marius and Sulla, a new cast of political characters was taking power in Rome. Julius Caesar, Pompey, Crassus, Cicero, Cato, and others are all legends of history for good reason. The interplay between these men and their competing ambitions combined with the long term structural issues that had plagued the Republic since the beginning to create the conditions for one last Civil War that would put the dying Republic out of it's misery. 

This is Part V in a series on the downfall of the Roman Republic. It focuses on the rise of some of the key political figures in the late stages of the Roman Republic and how violence and cynical political norms were now integrated into the Roman system. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Jun 24, 2019

As violence increasingly became a tool at the disposal of corrupt and cynical Romans, it also became a last resort for frustrated and hopeless Romans and Italian Allies. As a result of the Republic's failure to address systemic social and economic issues, the Social War broke out between Rome and the Italian Allies. In the aftermath of this devastating war, the famous Gaius Marius and Lucius Cornelius Sulla waged a titanic and bloody war for the fate of the Roman Republic. The endemic violence and zero-sum nature of the conflict ultimately ensured the future demise of the Republic. 

This is Part IV in a series on the downfall of the Roman Republic. It focuses on questions of citizenship in Ancient Rome, the Social War, and the epic struggle between Sulla and Marius. Sulla claimed victory, but ultimately for the Roman Republic it was ashes in the end. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Jun 3, 2019

Many historians have cited moral decline that began after the Punic Wars as a leading cause in the decline of the Roman Republic. While there are different interpretations of this idea, the conflict between ambition and equality was a problem that was built into the Roman system and was ultimately never completely resolved in the Republic. A frustrated underclass of Roman citizens and other Italians who saw their farms shrinking and their economic opportunities limited as a result of the changing economic conditions after the Punic War provided the perfect opportunity for cynical politicians to appeal to populism and ambitious maneuvering to increase their own power and prestige. Whether you view them as populists or genuine reformers, men like Tiberius Gracchus and Gaius Gracchus identified problems in the Roman system and tried to fix them as they saw fit. Ultimately the system swallowed them up and they failed to produce long lasting change to the corrupted system. But their demise introduced a new crisis that the Republic would never solve: political violence. 

This is Part III in a series on the downfall of the Roman Republic. It focuses on Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus and their attempt to alleviate disenfranchised Romans who felt the new Roman economic system was leaving them behind.

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

 

May 13, 2019

The Roman Republic's victory over Carthage in the Punic Wars established Rome as the dominant power in the Mediterranean. But not without cost. In order to defeat Carthage, Rome had to resort to it's own ancient version of total war, which would have insidious effects that would only manifest themselves in the years to come. Victory in the war also led to a fundamental change in the way the Roman economy worked over the years. This led to increased wealth inequality, political and economic corruption, population shifts, and questions over citizenship that would ultimately create friction in the Republic.

This is Part II in a series on the fall of the ancient Roman Republic. It gives an overview of the Punic Wars, and goes over how Rome's victory in these wars led to incredible shifts in Roman politics, economics, and moral norms that would ultimately create the conditions necessary for the Republic to fall.

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

 

Apr 22, 2019

Does history repeat itself? Many people have asked this question over the years, but it seems more relevant as interested parties look to the past for answers to solve our seemingly increasing mess of problems in the modern world. If the goal of studying history is to learn from the past and avoid making the same mistakes, there is perhaps no better topic to learn about than the ancient Roman Republic. The downfall of the once durable and effective democratic institution is worth studying and is an important tale that can teach lessons relevant to virtually every element of modern life, from politics to economics to everyday social life. 

This is Part I in a series on the downfall of the ancient Roman Republic. It goes over the basic structure of the Roman democracy, some of the features that were built into the system, and takes a look at how and why the system was effective. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Apr 1, 2019

What can a guy who spent much of his day naked in public as he heckled bystanders from his perch in a bath tub teach us about philosophy and history? Quite a bit it turns out. Known as "the dog" for his shameless and strange behavior, Diogenes the Cynic is one of the most widely revered of the Ancient Greek thinkers and one of the first philosophers of cynicism. Analyzing his life can lead to important lessons on moral virtue, happiness, freedom of speech, self-sufficiency, mental and physical toughness, endurance, humor, and materialism.

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Mar 11, 2019

Colonialism and Imperialism are among the most controversial historical narratives. An outbreak of Sleeping Sickness disease in the Belgian Congo during the early 1900's provides a lens through which to examine the legacy of European Imperialism and the Scramble for Africa. The epidemic brings up interesting questions about the implementation of control by colonial authorities, the use of western medicine in Africa, and the legacy of Imperialism.

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Feb 19, 2019

After the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, a fierce political battle ensued for the soul of modern China. But it was the ordinary people of China who had spent the past 10 years fighting through chaos, violence, and oppression who helped forge a new path. Many never made it through the revolution, but many also took matters into their own hands by finding creative ways to survive and seize economic opportunities to put food on the table and protect their families. Millions took part in a "silent revolution" to preserve their traditions, cultures, and identities in the face of unimaginable tragedy. For the survivors who made it out on the other side of the Cultural Revolution, the world would never be the same. 

This is the final episode in a series on the Cultural Revolution. It focuses on the politics surrounding Mao Zedong as well as the actions of everyday people to survive and drive change in China. Thanks for listening to the series. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Feb 12, 2019

In the 1970's Red Guards and "undesirables" were forced to toil away in rural China working at re-education camps or doing manual labor in the people's communes. The ordinary people of China continued to suffer and found little motivation to carry on the Cultural Revolution. Mao and the communist party realized they needed to add extra incentive if the revolutionary goals were to be realized. It turns out nothing motivates like a strong dose of nationalism and the fear of nuclear war.

This is part VII in a multi-part series on the Cultural Revolution in China. It focuses on the mass movement of people into the countryside, and the mobilization of the entire country for a potential war. The next episode after this will be the last episode in the series, discussing the end of the Cultural Revolution.  

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Feb 5, 2019

The Cultural Revolution began as a campaign against bad class elements, but spiraled out of control as counter-revolutions emerged throughout the country between rebel groups and the local party establishments. As the chaos got out of control, the army had to step in and take control of the country. But whose side would they be on? Sadly for the average person in China at this period, it probably didn't matter as the violence and destruction would continue.

This is Part VI in a series on the Cultural Revolution. It focuses on what was probably the most chaotic and destructive period of the Cultural Revolution. Future episodes will discuss how the end of the Cultural Revolution is in sight, but a whole lot more tragedy would unfold before then. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Jan 29, 2019

By 1967, China was engulfed in the chaos of the Cultural Revolution. But the violence of the counter-revolutions and counter-counter-revolutions was not the only source of misery for ordinary people in China. As fear spread and the Cultural Revolution expanded, it began to have a significant impact on the command economy of China. The campaign to eliminate the Four Olds was growing in intensity, leaving businesses destroyed, trade halted, libraries burned, and people struggling to make a living. The entire economy of China revolved around one man: Mao Zedong.

This is Part V in a series on the Cultural Revolution. It focuses on the campaign to eliminate the Four Olds and how this impacted the economy of China. Future episodes will chronicle the further ebbs and flows of the Cultural Revolution. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Jan 22, 2019

By the end of August in 1966, it was clear that the Cultural Revolution was going to be a unique historical period of violence and upheaval. Violence and brutality were becoming routine, symptoms of the incredibly modern issues that the Cultural Revolution was creating, including student protests and the psychology behind them, leadership seemingly stoking the fires of mistrust and intimidation, and people not knowing which news sources to trust. One of the saddest elements of this violence and chaos was that it was often perpetrated by teenagers. What was life like for the Red Guards, what kinds of experiences did they have at mass rallies, and what made them tick?  

This is Part IV in a series on the Cultural Revolution. It focuses on the escalation of the Cultural Revolution in it's early phases and the experiences of Red Guards at mass rallies in Tiananmen Square. Future episodes will chronicle the further ebbs and flows of the Cultural Revolution. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Jan 15, 2019

During the first month of the Cultural Revolution Mao Zedong unleashed a whirlwind of chaos and confusion in China. Mao mobilized students as "Red Guards"- one part student group, one part paramilitary group- to terrorize class enemies and spread fear and paranoia. As Red Guard violence escalated from attacks on teachers to attacks on the power structure itself, within a single month the Cultural Revolution was already spiraling out of control. 

This is Part III in a series on the Cultural Revolution. It focuses on the formation of the Red Guards and the violence and chaos of the first month of the Cultural Revolution. Future episodes will chronicle the expansion and further tragedy of the Cultural Revolution.

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Jan 8, 2019

After the deaths of tens of millions of people during the Great Leap Forward, Mao Zedong had to re-establish control over the Communist Party in China. Through a process of political maneuvering and ruthless policy making, by 1966 Mao was finally ready to begin his Cultural Revolution.

This is Part II in a series on the Cultural Revolution. It talks mostly about the impacts of the Great Leap Forward and how Mao had to pave a new way forward that would ultimately culminate in the Cultural Revolution. This episode sets up a lot of the background and some of Mao's thought processes before the Cultural Revolution began. Later episodes will look at some more of the specific details and events of the Cultural Revolution. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Dec 17, 2018

The Cultural Revolution in China lasted roughly from 1966-1976. But the cultural disintegration and scars left from Mao Zedong's final campaign of terror and violence will last for generations to come. 

This is Part I in a series on the Cultural Revolution in China. It focuses on some of the bigger picture themes and ideas that will be discussed in the series. More specific details on the events of the Cultural Revolution will come in later parts of the series. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Nov 27, 2018

As Ji-Li Jiang describes in "Red Scarf Girl," the Cultural Revolution became more sinister over time and the psychological pressure on Ji-Li to conform became greater. When the humiliations, beatings, and deaths started hitting close to home, Mao Zedong's ultimate loyalty test was given to millions of children in China: Party or family?

This is the second and final part in a series on Ji-Li Jiang's experience during the Cultural Revolution. 

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

Nov 6, 2018

Kids often get overlooked in traditional historical narratives. But in China around 1966, the communist leader Mao Zedong realized that he could weaponize the youth of China to achieve his political goals. The result was disastrously tragic. In her memoir "Red Scarf Girl," Ji-li Jiang tells the horrifying story of the Cultural Revolution through the eyes of a young adult.

This is Part I in a series on Ji-Li Jiang's experience during the Cultural Revolution. Part II should be out in a few weeks.  

Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist

If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

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